Author Topic: "Getting to the Heart of the Appeal of Video Games"  (Read 13062 times)

Offline Baggins

  • Read-Only
  • Magical Genie
  • *
  • Posts: 2554
Re: "Getting to the Heart of the Appeal of Video Games"
« Reply #20 on: August 05, 2011, 09:49:26 AM »
It's more sensational?
Well, ya, King's Quest is on Earth. Daventry is very old city from a long time ago. It's in ruins now and people aren't quite sure exactly where it used to be. There are some archaeologists searching through the ruins, they think they know its Daventry. But its somewhere on Earth."-Roberta Williams http://kingsquest.wikia.com/wiki/File:Daventryisearth.ogg

Offline glottal

  • Devoted Knight
  • ***
  • Posts: 257
Re: "Getting to the Heart of the Appeal of Video Games"
« Reply #21 on: August 06, 2011, 05:34:59 PM »
You know, I have a friend who is an anthropologist who specializes in game studies (particularly electronic games).  And she frequently runs into reactions like FierceDeity's and BT's - why bother studying and researching games.  They should just be fun.  One of her counters is that games do impact society.  For example, people sometimes get married because they played World of Warcraft.  That is a serious consequence.  Also, where I live, being near-sighted is the norm for people my age or younger, so much so that people are shocked to find out that I am not actually wearing contacts, but in fact use the naked eye for everything.  Quite a few people have said, independently, that so many people are near-sighted because they spend so much time playing computer games as children.  I do not know whether or not that is true, but I think it's a valid research question, and maybe somebody has already done the research.  And if video games are causing almost an entire society to become near-sighted, it begs the question, why do people play video games so much?  Why not sports? Why not board games?  Why not find other forms of fun which don't mess with your eyesight?

EDIT: And if it turns out that the people I talked to are wrong - that computer/video games are not the main cause of widespread near-sightedness - it would lead to another research question - why are so many people blaming computer/video games and not the real cause?
« Last Edit: August 06, 2011, 05:46:06 PM by glottal »

Offline Baggins

  • Read-Only
  • Magical Genie
  • *
  • Posts: 2554
Re: "Getting to the Heart of the Appeal of Video Games"
« Reply #22 on: August 06, 2011, 08:32:19 PM »
I wouldn't think 'video games' causes the problem, but looking at any screen for any extended amount of time. TV, computer screens, portable systems, phones... Bright lights (cars/brights, house lights, neibhors lighting, city lights)? Any number of things that we subject our eyes to... If that is what's causing the problem, and not some local environmental issues, or even local genetics...

That being said I'm a technophile, and look at all kinds of things. Beyond a bit of eye straing, my vision is 20/20 or near to it. So what does that mean...? Does it mean anything? Annecdotal evidence isn't useful, unless it comes from many people to build statistical analysis.

But then remember, what about the large percentage in society, that don't play video games, because they can't afford them, or choose not to? What is there eyesight like in comparison? Does the same percentage show up? Do they also watch tv, or exposed to other sources of electronic light?

There were some interesting reports for example of a man who went on a killing rampage, and media accused video games for driving him to murder! Turns out the man never played video games in his life, and even despised them, thinking it was a waste of time! So it never was even part of his motive! Violent murders have been going on long before video games ever existed! Some studies may have shown that murders by those who play games is much lower than groups who don't play games!

Beyond that there are some interesting cultural studies, of cultures being created and lived within computer world. New languages, new types of currency, and barter systems over digital material. Essentially the 'unreal'. Which may be sold in the real world for real money.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2011, 08:39:37 PM by Baggins »
Well, ya, King's Quest is on Earth. Daventry is very old city from a long time ago. It's in ruins now and people aren't quite sure exactly where it used to be. There are some archaeologists searching through the ruins, they think they know its Daventry. But its somewhere on Earth."-Roberta Williams http://kingsquest.wikia.com/wiki/File:Daventryisearth.ogg

Offline Fierce Deity

  • Powerful Wizard
  • ******
  • Posts: 1506
  • Gender: Male
Re: "Getting to the Heart of the Appeal of Video Games"
« Reply #23 on: August 06, 2011, 11:11:02 PM »
You know, I have a friend who is an anthropologist who specializes in game studies (particularly electronic games).  And she frequently runs into reactions like FierceDeity's and BT's - why bother studying and researching games.  They should just be fun.  One of her counters is that games do impact society.  For example, people sometimes get married because they played World of Warcraft.  That is a serious consequence.  Also, where I live, being near-sighted is the norm for people my age or younger, so much so that people are shocked to find out that I am not actually wearing contacts, but in fact use the naked eye for everything.  Quite a few people have said, independently, that so many people are near-sighted because they spend so much time playing computer games as children.  I do not know whether or not that is true, but I think it's a valid research question, and maybe somebody has already done the research.  And if video games are causing almost an entire society to become near-sighted, it begs the question, why do people play video games so much?  Why not sports? Why not board games?  Why not find other forms of fun which don't mess with your eyesight?

EDIT: And if it turns out that the people I talked to are wrong - that computer/video games are not the main cause of widespread near-sightedness - it would lead to another research question - why are so many people blaming computer/video games and not the real cause?

In my defense, I am not saying that technology doesn't affect society, because that would be silly. Video games affect society drastically. Especially when every politician and their brother goes on a rampage against violence in video games just to reassure that they will get a re-election. But I digress. One thing I will have to point out is the sociological impact that occurs when video games are shared. World of Warcraft doesn't ensure that people will get married because they bought World of Warcraft, it ensures social aspects. These happen no matter where you go. I'm sure that somewhere in the world, a poor soul proposed to their significant other via text messaging. It's a matter of convenience, not so much consequence. People will meet and get married regardless of whether a World of Warcraft exists. It just helps people network via similar interests. But once again, that happens regardless.

If video games are affecting peoples' vision, it's no longer research on video games, it would be optometric research. And like Baggins was pointing out, damage to one's sight is a consequence of their actions. If I told you to stare into the sun for an entire hour, I can't imagine you would suffer any less damage (if there is any damage at all) than if you were to stare at a computer screen. This is entirely fabricated by one's inability to take precaution. It's a complete "What if?" situation, and if it does become a detrimental plague on society, then at least we know the reason. So it will become an "I told you so . . ." situation.

This hardly touches on the topic of studying and researching video games. At least, not on the same spectrum as I was arguing. So while we are comparing apples to oranges, why don't we discuss how video games can unrightfully convert consumers to paganism.  ::)
Freudian Slip - "When you say one thing, but mean your mother."
 

anything